Schindler’s Ark by Thomas Keneally

Reviewed by
February–March 1983, no. 48
John Hanrahan reviews 'Schindler’s Ark' by Thomas Keneally

Schindler’s Ark

by Thomas Keneally

Hodder & Stoughton, 432 pp, $19.95 pb

Schindler’s Ark by Thomas Keneally

Reviewed by
February–March 1983, no. 48

Thomas Keneally excels in stories of guilt. Schindler’s Ark joins Bring Larks and Heroes and The Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith as his best work so far. Organised and complacent cruelty to convicts, to blacks, to Jews grabs Keneally’s imagination to produce his most powerful novels. On one level, Schindler’s Ark is the story of a man who played the system to ensure the survival of his Jewish factory workers. On another level, it is their story, a compelling narrative of suffering and the will to survive. Fifty years after Hitler’s vaguely democratic marching to power, Keneally compels us to believe in the reality of the Holocaust. He writes of death, separation, and survival with the matter-of-fact authority of Kevin Heinz telling us how to mulch our petunias in a time of drought.

John Hanrahan reviews 'Schindler’s Ark' by Thomas Keneally

Schindler’s Ark

by Thomas Keneally

Hodder & Stoughton, 432 pp, $19.95 pb

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