Cultural Studies

Kári Gíslason reviews 'Scandinavians: In search of the soul of the North' by Robert Ferguson

Kári Gíslason
06 December 2017

When I was twenty-seven, I visited mainland Scandinavia for the first time. I had spent the last of my travel money on a rail pass, and I was on a tight budget. One day, I thought I would More

Andrew Fuhrmann reviews 'Culture' by Terry Eagleton

Andrew Fuhrmann
26 September 2016

No one should be surprised that Terry Eagleton has written yet another book about the excesses of academic postmodernism. Railing against the pretensions and deceptions and ...

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Andrea Goldsmith reviews 'In Praise of Forgetting: Historical memory and its ironies' by David Rieff

Andrea Goldsmith
23 May 2016

Over the past three decades, and particularly since the prime ministership of John Howard, there has been an extraordinary growth in the number of ...

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Claudio Bozzi reviews 'The Italians' by John Hooper

Claudio Bozzi
30 July 2015

The Economist’s foreign correspondent John Hooper turns to a quintessentially English theme: Italians. Italians seem to be a sort of recurring obsession, a presence that periodically intrudes into the English imaginary. The cultural construction of Italy is a particularly sensitive and timely topic in the context of debates about the future of Europe. The a ... More

Gay Bilson reviews 'Women in Dark Times' by Jacqueline Rose

Gay Bilson
02 March 2015

In a review of several books on motherhood (LRB, 14 June 2014), Jacqueline Rose – feminist, writer on psychoanalysis, English professor, ‘public intellectual’ – interprets Adrienne Rich’s belief that to give birth is to testify to the possibilities of humanity, as a v ... More

Valuing the Humanities

Colin Steele
29 April 2014

Helen Small, Professor of English at Pembroke College, Oxford, adopts a pragmatic and non-polemical approach in addressing The Value of the Humanities. This topic has been much debated recently as political and economic pressures on universities and funding agencies have led to an alleged devaluation of the humanities.

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Stuart Macintyre visits 'Fractured Times'

Stuart Macintyre
17 January 2014

As he approached his fiftieth birthday, Eric Hobsbawm finally won recognition. His Primitive Rebels (1959) was an innovative study of millenarian rural movements. In 1962 he published The Age of Revolution, the first of four books that encompassed the modern era with unrivalled powers of synthesis, and his volume on Labouring Men (1964) ga ... More

Virginia Lloyd reviews 'Profits of Doom'

Virginia Lloyd
31 October 2013

One of the literary legacies of the financial crisis is a type of travel writing focused on the local social, economic, and environmental effects of unfettered global capitalism. There are two types of such books. Michael Lewis is perhaps the best known and most widely read author of the first kind, in which the reporter becomes a kind of tour guide to the financial ... More

Dion Kagan reviews 'Out of Shape'

Dion Kagan
28 August 2013

Much has been said about our tendency to feel bad about our bodies, but not quite in the way Mel Campbell goes about it. The fit of clothes is a more interesting, if more elusive, cultural story than the predictable outrage over fashion’s ever slimmer bodies or recent storms about ‘plus size’ models. Out of Shape addresses these controversi ... More

Robert Reynolds reviews 'The End of the Homosexual?' by Dennis Altman

Robert Reynolds
22 August 2013
Four decades after his seminal book ‘Homosexual: Oppression and Liberation’, Dennis Altman has published a new study of the homosexual in Australian society. Robert Reynolds is our reviewer. More
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