Peter Rose

Peter Rose

Peter Rose is the Editor and CEO of Australian Book Review. His books include a family memoir, Rose Boys (2001), which won the National Biography Award in 2003. He has published two novels and six poetry collections, most recently The Subject of Feeling (UWA Publishing, 2015).

Editorial: 'An update on the pandemic and the Australia Council' by Peter Rose

May 2020, no. 421 27 April 2020
Editorial: 'An update on the pandemic and the Australia Council' by Peter Rose
What a difference a month makes! In late March, as we were sending the April issue to press, how bleak the outlook was here in Australia, but especially overseas. Future print editions seemed doubtful because of the scale of the threat and the imminent lockdown. One month later, any interruption to the print edition seems unlikely, with two caveats. Australia Post deliveries have slowed in recent ... (read more)

Australian Book Review and the Australia Council

Book Talk 04 April 2020
Australian Book Review and the Australia Council
Australian Book Review, while congratulating successful applicants, deplores the Australia Council’s decision not to fund it and other literary magazines in the 2021–24 round. For the first time in decades, Australia’s national literary and arts review will not be funded by the federal government.  In depriving ABR and other fine literary magazines of funding, the Council and ... (read more)

'Come, Memory', a new poem by Peter Rose

April 2020, no. 420 19 March 2020
‘Come, memory, let us seek them there in the shadows.’ Donald Justice, ‘On the Death of Friends in Childhood’   I think of you now for the first timein about five times as many yearsas you actually lived, so uncomplainingly,they always said, as they do of the dead.Your name shadows meas we shadowed your small coffin,toggle-straight in our uniforms –why, I have no idea, for my ... (read more)

Coronavirus and Australian Book Review

April 2020, no. 420 17 March 2020
Coronavirus and Australian Book Review
After a summer of bushfires across the nation and phenomenal loss and destruction, Australia – like the rest of world – now faces a health crisis of fearsome scope. As we go to press (earlier than planned because of present uncertainties), the scale of the threat, unprecedented in our times, is becoming stark. Australian Book Review is mindful of the enormous challenges posed by the coronavir ... (read more)

La Bohème (Opera Australia)

ABR Arts 07 January 2020
La Bohème (Opera Australia)
Gale Edwards’s production of La Bohème is back for an extended summer season – sixteen performances no less. This production has been filling theatres since its creation in 2011. It may not run for as long as Franco Zeffirelli’s 1981 extravaganza, still an annual fixture at the Metropolitan Opera, but it probably has another good decade to go. Revived here by Liesel Badorrek, it works consi ... (read more)

Turandot (Opera Australia)

ABR Arts 26 November 2019
Turandot (Opera Australia)
Reviewing the recent production of Madama Butterfly in Adelaide, I dwelt on Giacomo Puccini’s ceaseless search for new subjects between operas and how he considered everything from a Zola novel to the historical Marie Antoinette before settling on the story of Cio-Cio San. The path to Turandot, his final, unfinished opera, was similarly curious. Puccini, the world’s most famous composer, ... (read more)

Peter Rose reviews 'Yellow Notebook: Diaries, Volume I, 1978–1987' by Helen Garner

December 2019, no. 417 22 November 2019
Peter Rose reviews 'Yellow Notebook: Diaries, Volume I, 1978–1987' by Helen Garner
‘Several new perceptions of the unfortunate creature that I am have dawned upon me consolingly.’ Franz Kafka, 7 January 1911   Anyone who keeps a diary day in, day out for decades knows why Helen Garner, a few years ago, destroyed her early ones, deeming them boring and self-obsessed. Incineration has a long, proud history: think of Henry James, late in life, at his incinerator in ... (read more)

Madama Butterfly (State Opera South Australia)

ABR Arts 18 November 2019
Madama Butterfly (State Opera South Australia)
With certain artists – the luminaries, the abiders – it’s tempting to assign a kind of inevitability to their oeuvres. The musicals of Cole Porter, the satires of Jane Austen, the exiguous poems of T.S. Eliot have a kind of perfection that make them seem nonchalant. But here we run the risk of overlooking the sheer chanciness of most artistic careers – not to mention the false starts and t ... (read more)

Nina Stemme Returns (Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra)

ABR Arts 06 November 2019
Nina Stemme Returns (Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra)
Three years ago, almost to the day, the great Swedish soprano Nina Stemme made her Australian début – in Hobart, a little unexpectedly. Joining her was Stuart Skelton, with whom she had just performed in Mariusz Treliński’s production of Tristan und Isolde at the Metropolitan Opera – a sombre, martial, digital creation that divided critics and audiences alike (‘overdetermined darkness an ... (read more)

Peter Rose reviews 'Ransom' by David Malouf

May 2009, no. 311 01 May 2009
Peter Rose reviews 'Ransom' by David Malouf
In David Malouf’s second and perhaps most celebrated novel, An Imaginary Life (1978), of which this new novella is so reminiscent, the Roman poet Ovid is exiled to a primitive village named Tomis. Ovid, ‘called Naso because of the nose’, has been banished due to his unspoken affronts. In Tomis, Ovid, doomed and apart, senses that he must acquire in simplicity a new kind of wisdom: Must it ... (read more)