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September 2019, no. 413

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Felicity Fenner

Felicity Fenner

Felicity Fenner teaches at the University of NSW and is a curator of contemporary exhibitions, including the 2008 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art.

ABR Arts

Most Popular

Book of the Week

Fiction

The Old Lie by Claire G. Coleman

Reviewed by

In The Old Lie, Claire G. Coleman has given herself a right of reply to her award-winning début novel, Terra Nullius (2007). Here, she strips away some of the racial ambiguity of the human–alien invasion allegory of that novel and leaves in its place a meaty analysis of colonisation and imperialism ...

Interview

January–February 2018, no. 398

Open Page with Chris Masters

I figure that with practice I might improve. Even if I don’t, I will persist. If in an entire book there is one sentence that works, I see it as proof of growth. Sometimes that sentence stares back at me as if it came from somewhere else ...

Interview

March 2019, no. 409

Open Page with Debra Adelaide

Generally where I am right now, in my study writing, but also in the garden. It is very uncomplicated. 

Interview

May 2019, no. 411

Emma Lew is Poet of the Month

A bit of space and peace are good for writing poetry. I like to feel warm, so a small electric heater should be blowing on my ankles.

From the Archive

November 2001, no. 236

Brian McFarlane reviews 'Dirt Music' by Tim Winton

Talk about unlikely associations. My first response to the opening chapter of Tim Winton’s latest novel was how its sense of a life at a standstill, awaiting some new impulse, reminded me of Jane Austen’s Emma. Winton’s protagonist, Georgie Jutland, with a string of unsatisfactory relationships behind her ...

From the Archive

October 2006, no. 285

Kate McFadyen reviews Carpentaria by Alexis Wright

There is a mesmerising scene in Carpentaria when Joseph Midnight is asked if he has seen the fugitive Will Phantom, a young local Aboriginal man who is single-handedly waging a guerrilla war against a large lead ore mining company. He eyes the questioner and astutely spots him as a ‘Southern blackfella …

From the Archive

October 2001, no. 235

Evelyn Juers reviews 'The Feel of Steel' by Helen Garner

Following True Stories, published in 1996, The Feel of Steel is Helen Garner’s second collection of non-fiction. It comprises thirty-one pieces of varying lengths. Longer narratives such as ‘Regions of Thick-Ribbed Ice’, about a hair-raising trip to Antarctica, and ‘A Spy in the House of Excrement’, about the outcome ...

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