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The Cherry Orchard

A tin-eared production of Chekhov’s classic
Belvoir St Theatre
by
ABR Arts 03 June 2021

The Cherry Orchard

A tin-eared production of Chekhov’s classic
Belvoir St Theatre
by
ABR Arts 03 June 2021
Pamela Rabe, Mandela Mathia, Charles Wu, and Josh Price in Belvoir St Theatre's The Cherry Orchard (photograph by Brett Boardman)
Pamela Rabe, Mandela Mathia, Charles Wu, and Josh Price in Belvoir St Theatre's The Cherry Orchard (photograph by Brett Boardman)

What did Anton Pavlovich Chekhov ever do to Sydney theatre that Sydney theatre should treat him as it does? Since Tamas Ascher’s superb STC production of Uncle Vanya hit the stage in 2010, Sydney has been subjected to performances of The Seagull, Ivanov, The Present (aka Platonov), and Three Sisters that, in their attempts to be ‘relevant’, have ridden roughshod over the subtle, devastatingly acute dissections of humanity with which Chekhov presents us.

Comments (3)

  • Thank you, Ian, our thoughts exactly.
    Posted by Mark Sheldon
    13 June 2021
  • Having just sat through this, we heartily agree with this review. Good to see.
    Posted by Jamie Simpson
    13 June 2021
  • Anton Chekhov's 'The Cherry Orchard' is performed all around the world because it speaks of universals and has as much relevance today as it did over 100 years ago. Sadly, Eamon Flack's production of The Cherry Orchard is a travesty. It would be giving this production too higher accolade to call it undergraduate - it's an abomination. Flack's production is unrecognisable from the original play with all the added politically correct clichés - and added for what effect? The inclusion of ethnically diverse actors did nothing for their cause and nothing for the truth of Chekhov's play. Write stories for the Sudanese refugees, Indian immigrants and gay minority groups, tell us their stories, but stop using them as a token to ensure funding. Or, if you use culturally diverse actors. ensure that their presence serves the text and not some shallow attempt at being inclusive and clever. It is an embarrassment and patronising to both audience and actors. No one's story was told by Eaman Flack's disastrous production, least of all Anton Chekhov's.
    Posted by Andrea Baker
    05 June 2021