NSW contributor

Dan Dixon reviews Trick Mirror: Reflections on self-delusion by Jia Tolentino

Dan Dixon
23 July 2019

Writers describing the contemporary moment abound. Many do it well, but few do it as shrewdly as Jia Tolentino. With Trick Mirror: Reflections on self-delusion, Tolentino has prod More

'Behrouz Boochani and the politics of naming' by Omid Tofighian

Omid Tofighian
26 July 2019

In June 2019, Australian Book Review announced the ABR Behrouz Boochani Fellowship, an initiative generously funded by Peter McMullin in association with the Peter McMull More

Julia Kindt reviews Socrates in Love: The making of a philosopher by Armand D’Angour

Julia Kindt
23 July 2019

It may be tempting to think we already know Socrates, the Athenian philosopher whose most famous dictum remains that he was wise only insofar as he was aware of his own ignorance. Although More

Paul Giles reviews Permanent Revolution: The reformation and the illiberal roots of liberalism by James Simpson

Paul Giles
22 July 2019

The argument of James Simpson’s Permanent Revolution is that the emergence of liberalism as a cultural and political category in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries was shap More

2019 Calibre Essay Prize (Winner): 'Nah Doongh’s Song' by Grace Karskens

Grace Karskens
22 July 2019

Nah Doongh was among the first generation of Aboriginal children who grew up in a conquered land. She was born around 1800 in the Country near present-day Kingswood, just south-east of More

Kelly D. Wiltshire reviews A Little History of Archaeology by Brian Fagan

Kelly Wiltshire
22 July 2019

As the old saying goes, one should never judge a book by its cover; however, the instantly recognisable iconography on the cover of A Little History of Archaeology does provide an More

Nicole Abadee reviews Frankissstein: A love story by Jeanette Winterson

Nicole Abadee
03 June 2019

What distinguishes man from machines? What is artificial life, death, progress? These are just some of the questions Jeanette Winterson explores in her brilliant new novel, Frankissste More

Desley Deacon reviews Seven Big Australians: Adventures with comic actors by Anne Pender

Desley Deacon
23 May 2019

Nowadays every second young person seems to want to be a stand-up comic, an occupation that perfectly represents the ‘gig’ economy in its precariousness and occasional nature. Anne Pen More

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Desley Deacon
01 July 2009

Nowadays every second young person seems to want to be a stand-up comic, an occupation that perfectly represents the ‘gig’ economy in its precariousness and occasional nature. Anne Pen More

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