Memoir

Alice Whitmore reviews Requiem with Yellow Butterflies by James Halford

Alice Whitmore
17 June 2019

Requiem with Yellow Butterflies begins, aptly, with a death. Sitting at his office in Brisbane, the author receives news that Gabriel García Márquez has died at his home in Mexi More

Neal Blewett reviews 'Losing It' by Annabel Crabb, 'Loner: Inside a Labor tragedy' by Bernard Lagan, and 'The Latham Diaries' by Mark Latham

Neal Blewett
07 June 2019

Although you might not guess it from media comment, The Latham Diaries (MUP, $39.95 hb, 429 pp, 0522852157) is the most important book yet published on Labor’s wilderness y More

David McCooey reviews 'Hoi Polloi' by Craig Sherborne

David McCooey
07 June 2019

A laughing man, according to Flaubert, is stronger than a suffering one. But as Craig Sherborne’s extraordinary new memoir of childhood and youth shows, the distinction isn’t that simp More

Robin Grove reviews 'Mao’s Last Dancer' by Li Cunxin

Robin Grove
07 June 2019

There were seven of them, as in a folk tale. The family was too poor to put shoes on their feet. They lived in a village called New. Hard though life was, they knew it would be worse witho More

Peter Rose reviews 'My Life As Me: A memoir' by Barry Humphries

Peter Rose
03 June 2019

When Barry Humphries published his first volume of autobiography, many readers were left wanting ‘More, please’ – avid as gladdie-waving victims during one of his shows; voracious as More

David McCooey reviews 'The Twelfth of Never: A memoir' by Louis Nowra

David McCooey
24 May 2019

Louis Nowra was born in 1950 and is – as he presents himself in this memoir – that very mid­-century thing, an outsider. An outsider in terms of class, mental constitution, and sex More

Gemma Betros reviews The Existential Englishman: Paris among the artists by Michael Peppiatt

Gemma Betros
22 April 2019

I wanted to like this memoir very much, not least because the inside of the book jacket promises, with some originality, a ‘not-uncritical love letter to Paris’. People (myself included) have a tendency to wax rha More

Astrid Edwards reviews Diving into Glass: A memoir by Caro Llewellyn

Astrid Edwards
26 March 2019

Memoirs of illness are tricky. The raw material is often compelling: dramatic symptoms, embarrassing public moments, and unavoidable relationship pressures. The challenge is to share that More

Susan Sheridan reviews Beyond Words: A year with Kenneth Cook by Jacqueline Kent

Susan Sheridan
22 February 2019

Kenneth Cook (1929-87) was a prolific author best known for his first novel, Wake in Fright (1961), which was based on his experience as a young journalist in Broken Hill in the 1 More

Morag Fraser reviews 'Leeward: A memoir' by Geoffrey Lehmann

Morag Fraser
18 December 2018

The poet James McAuley once told a group of Sydney university students – ‘forcefully’,  as Geoffrey Lehmann recalls – that poets should have a career unconnected with literature. More

Page 1 of 10