The Child in Shakespeare by Charlotte Scott

Reviewed by
September 2020, no. 424
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Rayne Allinson reviews 'The Child in Shakespeare' by Charlotte Scott

The Child in Shakespeare

by Charlotte Scott

Oxford University Press, $100 hb, 192 pp

Buy this book

The Child in Shakespeare by Charlotte Scott

Reviewed by
September 2020, no. 424

The figure of the child stands at both ends of human experience in Shakespeare’s plays. The span between our ‘mewling and puking’ infancy and our ‘second childishness’ of old age runs to little more than a dozen lines in Jacques’s famous ‘seven ages of man’ speech in As You Like It, before we slip into ‘mere oblivion, / Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.’ In the intervening years, our identity as children might shift as we undergo rites of passage into adulthood, as our relationships with our own parents evolve or as we become parents ourselves. But the child – the archetype of our essential nature – waits patiently for our return. Even Lear, the grand patriarch who disowns the truth-speaking child of his heart, must be racked on the fiery wheel of experience before he can become the ‘child-changed father’ Cordelia recognises in the end.

Rayne Allinson reviews 'The Child in Shakespeare' by Charlotte Scott

The Child in Shakespeare

by Charlotte Scott

Oxford University Press, $100 hb, 192 pp

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