Mandatory Murder: A true history of homicide and injustice in an outback town by Steven Schubert

Reviewed by
November 2019, no. 416
Russell Marks reviews 'Mandatory Murder: A true history of homicide and injustice in an outback town' by Steven Schubert

Mandatory Murder: A true history of homicide and injustice in an outback town

by Steven Schubert

ABC Books, $32.99 pb, 306 pp, 9780733339394

Mandatory Murder: A true history of homicide and injustice in an outback town by Steven Schubert

Reviewed by
November 2019, no. 416

ABC journalist Steven Schubert’s first book, Mandatory Murder, could have been a definitive account of the bizarre sentencing of Zak Grieve for the murder of fellow Katherine resident Ray Niceforo in October 2011. To achieve this, it had to dig deeper and cover greater territory than existing accounts, including Dan Box’s mediocre documentary, The Queen & Zak Grieve, presented in six ‘webisodes’ on The Australian’s website.

Unfortunately, Mandatory Murder’s first 273 pages are given over to a fairly standard true-crime account – complete with shocksploitative details and police-style sardonic humour – of the investigation into Niceforo’s murder and the subsequent trials of Grieve, his mate Chris Malyschko, and Chris’s mother, Bronwyn Buttery (Niceforo’s partner). A third young man, Darren Halfpenny, separately pleaded guilty to murder. Although he doesn’t need to, Schubert seems to want to amplify the shock value; we even get gruesome colour photos supplied by police. True crime is a genre that often precludes illumination of the narratives of class and trauma that propel criminality in general, and this criminality in particular.

Russell Marks reviews 'Mandatory Murder: A true history of homicide and injustice in an outback town' by Steven Schubert

Mandatory Murder: A true history of homicide and injustice in an outback town

by Steven Schubert

ABC Books, $32.99 pb, 306 pp, 9780733339394

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