Waters of the World: The story of the scientists who unraveled the mysteries of our oceans, atmosphere, and ice sheets and made the planet whole by Sarah Dry

Reviewed by
April 2020, no. 420
Michael Adams reviews 'Waters of the World: The story of the scientists who unraveled the mysteries of our oceans, atmosphere, and ice sheets and made the planet whole' by Sarah Dry

Waters of the World: The story of the scientists who unraveled the mysteries of our oceans, atmosphere, and ice sheets and made the planet whole

by Sarah Dry

Scribe, $35 pb, 332 pp

Waters of the World: The story of the scientists who unraveled the mysteries of our oceans, atmosphere, and ice sheets and made the planet whole by Sarah Dry

Reviewed by
April 2020, no. 420

The publication of Rachel Carson’s book Silent Spring (1962) is widely regarded as one of the key moments in the development of the global environment movement. In the wake of Silent Spring, science fiction writer Frank Herbert published the first of the Dune series in 1965. Herbert presented complex descriptions of alternate planetary ecologies, with influential characters known as ‘planetologists’ (a new film version is due out this year). In 1972, the image of the ‘Blue Marble’ was released, a photo of Earth taken by the Apollo 17 crew on their way to the moon, also widely considered to be critical in influencing public understandings of our finite planet. Each of these developments extended a long history of exploratory research, experimentation and imagination about the deep and complex connections of Earth systems. Sarah Dry’s Waters of the World investigates six critical figures in this history.

Michael Adams reviews 'Waters of the World: The story of the scientists who unraveled the mysteries of our oceans, atmosphere, and ice sheets and made the planet whole' by Sarah Dry

Waters of the World: The story of the scientists who unraveled the mysteries of our oceans, atmosphere, and ice sheets and made the planet whole

by Sarah Dry

Scribe, $35 pb, 332 pp

From the New Issue

You May Also Like

Leave a comment

If you are an ABR subscriber, you will need to sign in to post a comment.

If you have forgotten your sign in details, or if you receive an error message when trying to submit your comment, please email your comment (and the name of the article to which it relates) to ABR Comments. We will review your comment and, subject to approval, we will post it under your name.

Please note that all comments must be approved by ABR and comply with our Terms & Conditions.