Grace Karskens

Grace Karskens

Grace Karskens is Professor of History at the University of New South Wales. She is a leading authority on early colonial Australia and also works in cross-cultural and environmental history. Grace began her career as a public historian and has a lifelong commitment to bringing good history to wide audiences. She is an active contributor to several significant cultural organisations, including Sydney Living Museums, the State Library of New South Wales, and the Dictionary of Sydney project. Her books include Inside the Rocks: The archaeology of a neighbourhood and the multi-award winning The Rocks: Life in early Sydney. Her book The Colony: A history of early Sydney won the 2010 Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Non-Fiction and the US Urban History Association’s prize for Best Book 2010. Her next book, People of the River: Lost worlds of early Australia, will be published by Allen & Unwin in 2020.

2019 Calibre Essay Prize (Winner): 'Nah Doongh’s Song' by Grace Karskens

August 2019, no. 413 22 July 2019
2019 Calibre Essay Prize (Winner): 'Nah Doongh’s Song' by Grace Karskens
Listen to this essay read by the author. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers are advised that the following essay contains images of people who have died. Nah Doongh was among the first generation of Aboriginal children who grew up in a conquered land. She was born around 1800 in the Country near present-day Kingswood, just south-east of Moorroo Morack, Penrith, and she lived until t ... (read more)

Grace Karskens reviews 'The Paper War: Morality, Print Culture, and Power in Colonial New South Wales' by Anna Johnston

October 2011, no. 335 27 September 2011
Grace Karskens reviews 'The Paper War: Morality, Print Culture, and Power in Colonial New South Wales' by Anna Johnston
‘A MISSIONARY ARRESTED! A LONDON MISSIONARY ARRESTED!!’ These alarming words were trumpeted in the Sydney Gazette in 1828, and they shout from the back cover of Anna Johnston’s The Paper War. Readers might be forgiven for assuming that this book is about scandals in early colonial Australia – all the more entertaining for involving clergymen. And in a way it is, for the man arrested, Rever ... (read more)