Angus Trumble

Angus Trumble

Angus Trumble is Senior Curator of Paintings and Sculpture at the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, Connecticut. Previously he was a Curator of European Art at the Art Gallery of South Australia. His latest publication is The Finger: A Handbook (2010). (Photograph by Mary Ellen Carroll)


Angus Trumble reviews 'Out of Australia: Prints and Drawings from Sidney Nolan to Rover Thomas' by Stephen Coppel

July–August 2012, no. 343 10 July 2012
Angus Trumble reviews 'Out of Australia: Prints and Drawings from Sidney Nolan to Rover Thomas' by Stephen Coppel
The British Museum’s connection with Australia goes right back to 29 April 1770, when Captain Cook landed at the place he called Botany Bay because of the large number of plant specimens gathered there by Joseph Banks, one of the Museum’s most influential early trustees. As a polyglot public institution dedicated by Act of Parliament (1753) to allowing any citizen to study and understand the w ... (read more)

Angus Trumble reviews 'Man with a Blue Scarf: On sitting for a portrait' by Martin Gayford

November 2010, no. 326 16 November 2011
Angus Trumble reviews 'Man with a Blue Scarf: On sitting for a portrait' by Martin Gayford
‘I kept thinking: if his face looks like this, what must his balls look like?’ David Hockney’s assessment of the craggy countenance of W.H. Auden is clipped and convenient, but I suspect Auden would have been far more interesting on the subject of sitting for Hockney. Given the concentration and quality of the encounters between English portrait painters or sculptors and their subjects, it i ... (read more)

Angus Trumble reviews 'The Hare With Amber Eyes: A hidden inheritance' by Edmund de Waal

June 2011, no. 332 24 May 2011
Angus Trumble reviews 'The Hare With Amber Eyes: A hidden inheritance' by Edmund de Waal
The Hare With Amber Eyes tells the migration story of ‘a very large collection of very small objects’, specifically 264 netsuke (pronounced like ‘jet ski’, from the Japanese characters for ne and tsuke, meaning ‘root’ and ‘attach’). Netsuke are small pieces of ivory, wood, metal, ceramic, or some other material, carved or otherwise decorated, and perforated for use as a toggle that ... (read more)