Bernard Whimpress reviews 'Feeling is the Thing that Happens in 1000th of a Second: A season of cricket photographer Patrick Eagar' by Christian Ryan and 'Lillee & Thommo: The deadly pair’s reign of terror' by Ian Brayshaw

Bernard Whimpress reviews 'Feeling is the Thing that Happens in 1000th of a Second: A season of cricket photographer Patrick Eagar' by Christian Ryan and 'Lillee & Thommo: The deadly pair’s reign of terror' by Ian Brayshaw

Feeling is the Thing that Happens in 1000th of a Second: A season of cricket photographer Patrick Eagar

by Christian Ryan

Riverrun, $35 hb, 248 pp, 9781786486820

Book Cover 2 Small

Lillee & Thommo: The deadly pair’s reign of terror

by Ian Brayshaw

Hardie Grant, $29.99 pb, 272 pp, 9781743792599

A modern cricket photographer using digital single-lens reflex cameras and high-speed motor drives can take 5,000 photos in a day’s play. With such a surfeit of images, the quality of seeing is diminished. For most of his career from the 1970s to the 2010s, English photographer Patrick Eagar would shoot four or five rolls of film, or around 150 to 180 pictures. An Eagar predecessor such as Dennis Oulds, using a plate camera, would take seventeen shots. As the photographers using plate cameras often took set positions, their technology restricted their view and they did not use the remote action devices pioneered by the 35mm men. Even so, the change to newer technology left some notable practitioners behind. According to Eagar, a leading photographer from the 1940s to the 1970s, Ken Kelly, used 35mm like a plate camera.

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Bernard Whimpress

Bernard Whimpress

Bernard Whimpress is a writer, historian, and former curator of the Adelaide Oval Museum. A member of the Australian Society for Sports History, Bernard has written twenty books mainly on sport, including The Official MCC Ashes Treasures, Passport to Nowhere: Aborigines in Australian Cricket 1850–1939, The Greatest Ashes Battles and as co-author The History of Australian Cricket. He published and edited the Australian cricket journal Baggy Green from 1998 to 2010.

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