Cassandra Atherton reviews 'Killing Commendatore' by Haruki Murakami, translated by Philip Gabriel and Ted Goossen

Cassandra Atherton reviews 'Killing Commendatore' by Haruki Murakami, translated by Philip Gabriel and Ted Goossen

Killing Commendatore

by Haruki Murakami, translated by Philip Gabriel and Ted Goossen

Harvill Secker, $29.99 pb, $45 hb, 637 pp, 9781787300194

There is a running joke in Japan that autumn doesn’t start each year until Haruki Murakami has lost the Nobel Prize for Literature. Most recently, in 2017, he lost to Kazuo Ishiguro, who was born in Japan but is now a British citizen. To date, two Japanese writers have been awarded the prize – Yasunari Kawabata (1968) and Kenzaburō Ōe (1994) – and many believe Murakami will be the next Japanese laureate. However, it won’t be this year, because the Nobel Prize for Literature has been postponed due to a sexual misconduct scandal, and while Murakami was one of four finalists for the substitute New Academy Prize, he has recently withdrawn from the prize stating that he wants ‘to concentrate on his writing, away from media attention’.

Read the rest of this article by subscribing to ABR Online for as little as $10 a month.

We offer a range of subscription options, including print, which can be found by clicking here. If you are already a subscriber, enter your username and password in the ‘Log In’ section in the top right-hand corner of the screen.

If you require assistance, contact us or consult the Frequently Asked Questions page.

Published in October 2018, no. 405
Cassandra Atherton

Cassandra Atherton

Cassandra Atherton is a poet and scholar.  She is a Harvard Visiting Fellow in English in 2015-2016.