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Avenue of Eternal Peace by Nicholas Jose

Reviewed by
October 1989, no. 115
Paul Salzman reviews 'Avenue of Eternal Peace' by Nicholas Jose

Avenue of Eternal Peace

by Nicholas Jose

Penguin, 300 pp, $19.99 pb

Avenue of Eternal Peace by Nicholas Jose

Reviewed by
October 1989, no. 115

This is, above all else, a timely novel. In an afterword describing the Beijing massacre, Nicholas Jose explains that he wrote Avenue of Eternal Peace in 1987. The novel ends with the growing push for democracy, with crowds milling in Tiananmen Square, and with a sense that change might be possible, if precarious. The afterword details the end of such hopes. Jose’s novel therefore has a strange air of elatedness surrounding it. On the one hand it offers a very rare example of contemporary Australian fiction confronting China. The fact that the map of history it stems from has changed so dramatically adds an extra fillip to the reader’s vicarious experience of the ‘new’ China, and especially of Australia’s increasingly blasé encounter with China – up until the recent repression. Perhaps it now stands as a testament to what might have been.

Paul Salzman reviews 'Avenue of Eternal Peace' by Nicholas Jose

Avenue of Eternal Peace

by Nicholas Jose

Penguin, 300 pp, $19.99 pb

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