David Rolph reviews 'The Tim Carmody Affair: Australia’s greatest judical crisis' by Rebecca Ananian-Welsh, Gabrielle Appleby, and Andrew Lynch

David Rolph reviews 'The Tim Carmody Affair: Australia’s greatest judical crisis' by Rebecca Ananian-Welsh, Gabrielle Appleby, and Andrew Lynch

The Tim Carmody Affair: Australia’s greatest judical crisis

by Rebecca Ananian-Welsh, Gabrielle Appleby, and Andrew Lynch

NewSouth $29.99 pb, 245 pp, 9781742234991

With a few notable exceptions (Michael Kirby springs to mind), judges in Australia do not have a high public profile. Many non-lawyers would struggle to name a judge currently serving on an Australian court. The lack of public profile is not really a problem. In fact, it should be viewed as a benefit. What judges do should be more important than who judges are. Publicity about what goes on in open court is important. As Lord Chief Justice Hewart famously observed, it ‘is of fundamental importance that justice should not only be done, but should be manifestly and undoubtedly be seen to be done’. The principle of open justice is crucial to the proper administration of justice. Publicity about individual judges is less so.

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David Rolph

David Rolph

David Rolph is an Associate Professor at the University of Sydney Faculty of Law. He is the author of several books, including Reputation, Celebrity and Defamation Law (2008) and the forthcoming Defamation Law (2015). From 2007 to 2013, David was the editor of the Sydney Law Review, one of Australia’s leading law journals.

Published in November 2016, no. 386

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