Life amid the ruins of Sri Lanka’s civil war

Life amid the ruins of Sri Lanka’s civil war

The Seasons of Trouble: Life amid the Ruins of Sri Lanka’s Civil War

by Rohini Mohan

Verso $32.99 hb, 256 pp, 9781781686003

In May 2009, Sri Lanka’s three-decade-long civil war came to an end with the government’s defeat of the separatist Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (known as the Tamil Tigers). The long conflict had brought a range of horrific abuses: deliberate shelling of civilian areas; suicide bombing of civilian targets; enforced disappearances; rape; forced conscription, including child soldiers; and the use of civilians as human buffers. In 2011 a UN panel of experts made preliminary findings that these abuses were violations of international humanitarian law and human rights law and that some could even amount to crimes against humanity. This prompted the current international investigation into the allegations by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

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Emily Howie

Emily Howie

Emily Howie is the director of advocacy and research at the Human Rights Law Centre.