Francis Fukuyama and pear-shaped politics

Francis Fukuyama and pear-shaped politics

Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalisation of Democracy

Forget the cliché about a week being a long time in politics. Two decades in this super-speed, globalised age is more than enough time, it seems, for even the ‘best’ political system to go pear-shaped.

A growing number of books in recent times have focused on the current travails of Western-style liberal democracy. Its litany of dysfunctions includes corrosive money politics, policy gridlock, and growing citizen uninterest. But it is Francis Fukuyama’s new book that best symbolises the current Zeitgeist of dashed hopes concerning the resilience of the West’s political system.

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Mark Triffitt

Mark Triffitt

Mark Triffitt lectures in public policy at the Melbourne School of Government, University of Melbourne, He is a former political journalist and senior political adviser. He is the previous Director of Strategic Communications for the Business Council of Australia and the Executive General Manager, Corporate Affairs for Wesfarmers Ltd.

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