From the Archive

Brenda Niall reviews 'The Shepherd’s Hut' by Tim Winton

Brenda Niall
22 February 2018

There are no sheep grazing anywhere near the shepherd’s hut of Tim Winton’s new novel. A few wild goats in the desolate landscape, some broken machinery: that’s all. The narrator, fi More

Beejay Silcox reviews 'Border Districts' by Gerald Murnane

Beejay Silcox
24 November 2017

There is a whiff of mythology about Gerald Murnane. He is quietly infamous for who he isn’t: for the things he’s never done (travel by aeroplane); the things he’ll never do (live out More

Laurie Steed reviews 'After Darkness' by Christine Piper

Laurie Steed
26 August 2014

Australia’s history is chequered at best. For every story of military heroism, there is one of discomfiting prejudice. So it is with Christine Piper’s After Darkness, which explores Australian history from the point of view of a Japanese doctor, Tomakazu Ibaraki, arrested as a national threat while in Broome, and sent to the Loveday internment camps in re ... More

Kerryn Goldsworthy reviews 'The Golden Age'

Kerryn Goldsworthy
25 August 2014

When the polio epidemics at the hinge of the twentieth century were catching hundreds of Australian children and adults in their web of pathogens, a pub in suburban Perth called ‘The Golden Age’ was converted – with its name unchanged – into a convalescent home for children who were recovering from polio but still unready to go back into the world. Joan Lond ... More

Robert Reynolds reviews 'The End of the Homosexual?' by Dennis Altman

Robert Reynolds
22 August 2013
Four decades after his seminal book ‘Homosexual: Oppression and Liberation’, Dennis Altman has published a new study of the homosexual in Australian society. Robert Reynolds is our reviewer. More

Jan McGuinness reviews 'The Memory Trap'

Jan McGuinness
28 April 2013

Andrea Goldsmith, in her seventh novel, plunges once more into a world of characters whose ideas and relationships swirl and churn around a psychological trigger. This time it is memory in all its errant, bewitching manifestations. Memory plays tricks as the old adage goes, and for the novel’s main characters it is the trick of emersion in an idealised but rupture ... More

Melinda Harvey reviews 'Questions of Travel' by Michelle de Kretser

Melinda Harvey
26 September 2012

In Overland back in 2006, Ken Gelder singled out Michelle de Kretser’s first novel, The Rose Grower (1999). as evidence of a contemporary Australian literature in crisis. Its foreign and historical setting, horticultural fetish, focus on private manners and primped prose, he argued, flaunted a rarefied and élitist aesthetics that wanted nothing to d ... More