Alison Broinowski

Alison Broinowski reviews 'The Untold History of the United States' by Oliver Stone and Peter Kuznick

Alison Broinowski
25 March 2013

It is ten years since the invasion of Iraq by the United States and the few countries willing to join it. Happening to be in Washington in February, and recalling worldwide protests in 2003, I was struck by what seems to be American amnesia about the war and its consequences. At least in Australia groups are exploring ways to prevent such catastrophic expediti ... More

Alison Broinowski on Asian Australian fiction in the Asian Century

Alison Broinowski
31 January 2013

White Papers are falling on Australia like confetti. We had two on foreign affairs and one on terrorism in the seven years to 2004; the third one on defence in four years will appear this year, and in October 2012 Ken Henry delivered Australia in the Asian Century. Defence White Papers are perennially concerned with Australia’s need for the material and mon ... More

Alison Broinowski reviews 'The Waterlow Killings' by Pamela Burton

Alison Broinowski
28 November 2012

To hear that Pamela Burton was writing about the deaths of Nick Waterlow, the prominent gallery director and exhibition curator, and his daughter Chloe, came as a surprise. Anthony Waterlow, Nick’s son and Chloe’s older brother, killed them both in Chloe’s Clovelly house, where he had been invited for dinner, and then, with the same knife, attacked her two-yea ... More

Alison Broinowski reviews 'Beneath the Darkening Sky' by Majok Tulba

Alison Broinowski
28 August 2012

Every migrant has a story. The past two decades have given us accounts of migration to Australia from so many Asian countries, and from so many viewpoints – sad, painful, funny, cynical, mystical – that little more seems left to tell. But now, out of Africa, comes a writer with a new and altogether more terrible tale.

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Alison Broinowski reviews '1Q84' by Haruki Murakami, translated by Jay Rubin and Philip Gabriel

Alison Broinowski
27 February 2012

Admirers of Haruki Murakami who waited for two years while successive parts of his twelfth novel sold millions in Japanese, are now rewarded for their patience with a big nugget of a book in English, which is already an international bestseller. The elegant cover shows an enigmatic night sky with two moons, which reappear on the endpapers and between the three parts. Rather than clutter one sin ... More

Alison Broinowski reviews 'David P. Forsythe: The Politics of Prisoner Abuse' by David P. Forsythe

Alison Broinowski
25 October 2011

Many of us would find it as hard as Shaw’s Ladvenu does to think of any good reason for torture. It seems medieval, it is abhorrent, it is internationally illegal, and it doesn’t work. More

Alison Broinowski reviews 'The Decline and Fall of the American Republic' by Bruce Ackerman

Alison Broinowski
24 May 2011

As people around the world watch events in the United States, many will agree that it is indeed an exceptional, if conflicted, nation. The sole superpower, with the world’s largest econo More

Alison Broinowski reviews 'Blossoms and Shadows' by Lian Hearn

Alison Broinowski
07 December 2010

Within little more than a decade, between the 1850s and the 1860s, seven centuries of Japanese feudalism and more than two hundred years of seclusion came to an end ...

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