The Story of Modern Pop

The Story of Modern Pop

Yeah Yeah Yeah: The Story of Modern Pop

by Bob Stanley

Faber, $39.95 pb, 776 pp, 9780571281978

It is difficult to imagine a more satisfying long-form narrative about pop music than Yeah Yeah Yeah. Although the book runs to almost 800 pages, British author Bob Stanley writes with such authority and infectious passion that the momentum never skips a beat. Beginning with the first British hit parade and the popularisation of the electric guitar, Stanley traces the arc through to modern forms such as dance and hip-hop while fulfilling the role of tour guide. He takes the reader through a museum of pop music, pausing before significant artefacts to offer erudite commentary, and encouraging the reader to don headphones and experience the sounds of each era.

In the introduction, Stanley states his intention of drawing a straight line – ‘with the odd wiggle and personal diversion’ – from the birth of the seven-inch single to the recent decline of pop music as a physical thing. Stanley selects 1952 as the art form’s beginning, and charts its next fifty years through five parts and sixty-five distinct chapters, which intelligently group together artists, labels, scenes, and genres. Footnotes are included on almost every second page, a stylistic trait which the author never abuses; each aside and knowing reference contributes to the wider story being told. The purpose of Yeah Yeah Yeah is to tell pop’s story, and since the vast majority of the most influential pop acts began in either England or the United States, it is in these two engine rooms that much of the narrative is situated. Only a couple of Australia’s contributions are mentioned in passing, most notably AC/DC and The Saints, two seminal rock bands.

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Published in December 2014, no. 367
Andrew McMillen

Andrew McMillen

Andrew McMillen is a freelance journalist and author based in Brisbane. His work has been published in Rolling Stone and elsewhere. His first book is Talking Smack: Honest Conversations About Drugs (UQP, 2014), in which leading musicians share their thoughts on, and experiences with, illicit, prescription, and legal drugs.

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