The missing

The missing

One Boy Missing

by Stephen Orr

Text Publishing, $29.99 pb, 288 pp, 9781922147271

Stephen Orr’s previous novel, Time’s Long Ruin (2010), which was short-listed for the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and long-listed for the Miles Franklin, explored the repercussions within a quiet Adelaide community of the disappearance of three of its most vulnerable members, closely related to the disappearance and presumed murder of the Beaumont children in 1966. It was a languid and thoughtful study of character and place, important in a novel that was never going to achieve any real resolution. Especially well drawn was the relationship between Henry, the narrator, and his detective father. One Boy Missing similarly explores the relationship between sons and fathers, and also has at its centre the generative mystery of children gone missing, although this novel is deceptively clothed in the tropes of a standard police procedural.

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Published in March 2014 no. 359
David Whish-Wilson

David Whish-Wilson

David Whish-Wilson is the author of The Summons (2006), Line of Sight (2010), and Zero at the Bone (2013). His most recent publication is Perth (2013), in the NewSouth city series. He lives in Fremantle, Western Australia, and coordinates the creative-writing program at Curtin University.

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