Bitter Wash Road

Bitter Wash Road

Bitter Wash Road

by Garry Disher

Text Publishing, $29.99 pb, 325 pp, 9781922079244

Garry Disher’s World War II novel Past the Headlands (2001) was inspired in part by his discovery of the diary of an army surgeon in Sumatra, who wrote of how his best friend was trying to arrange passage on a ship or plane that could take them back to Australia before the advancing Japanese army arrived. But one morning the surgeon woke to find that his friend had departed during the night. Mateship in a time of adversity, that most vaunted of masculine Australian virtues, had turned out to be a sham. The elusiveness of real friendship and love, and the difficulty of discerning what is true and what is false in human conduct, are recurring themes in Disher’s writing, and he visits them again in his latest book, Bitter Wash Road.

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Ray Cassin

Ray Cassin

Ray Cassin is a contributing editor of eurekastreet.com.au

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