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The Cinema of Steven Soderbergh: Indie Sex, Corporate Lies, and Digital Videotape by Andrew deWaard and R. Colin Tait

Reviewed by
October 2013, no. 355
Jake Wilson reviews 'The Cinema of Steven Soderbergh: Indie sex, corporate lies, and digital videotape' by Andrew deWaard and R. Colin Tait

The Cinema of Steven Soderbergh: Indie Sex, Corporate Lies, and Digital Videotape

by Andrew deWaard and R. Colin Tait

Wallflower Press (Footprint Books), $35.95 pb, 202 pp, 9780231165518

The Cinema of Steven Soderbergh: Indie Sex, Corporate Lies, and Digital Videotape by Andrew deWaard and R. Colin Tait

Reviewed by
October 2013, no. 355

In many ways, Steven Soderbergh could be described as an exemplary postmodern film-maker: smart, prolific, and pragmatic, at ease with Hollywood blockbusters and low-budget experiments alike. He knows enough about the nuts and bolts of technique to serve as his own cinematographer, and enough about the science of deal-making to sustain a parallel career as a producer (thirty films and counting, including such notable titles as Todd Haynes’s Far from Heaven [2002]).

Jake Wilson reviews 'The Cinema of Steven Soderbergh: Indie sex, corporate lies, and digital videotape' by Andrew deWaard and R. Colin Tait

The Cinema of Steven Soderbergh: Indie Sex, Corporate Lies, and Digital Videotape

by Andrew deWaard and R. Colin Tait

Wallflower Press (Footprint Books), $35.95 pb, 202 pp, 9780231165518

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