Allen & Unwin

Jan McGuinness reviews 'Killing Fairfax' by Pamela Williams and 'Rupert Murdoch' by David McKnight

Jan McGuinness
30 October 2013

With James Packer and Lachlan Murdoch grinning smugly on its cover, Killing Fairfax: Packer, Murdoch and the Ultimate Revenge projects a strong message that they are indeed th More

Dina Ross reviews 'My Mother, My Father' edited by Susan Wyndham

Dina Ross
09 October 2013

In A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius (2000), novelist Dave Eggers recounts the horror of losing both his parents within one year, leaving him and his sister as sole carers of their young brother. Eggers More

Jacqueline Kent reviews 'The Stalking of Julia Gillard: How the Media and Team Rudd Contrived to Bring down the Prime Minister' by Kerry-Anne Walsh

Jacqueline Kent
22 August 2013
Jacqueline Kent – Julia Gillard’s first biographer – reviews journalist Kerry-Anne Walsh’s highly partisan account of Gillard’s ill-fated prime ministership and the ceaseless hospitality of the Rudd camp. More

Ray Cassin reviews 'Unholy Trinity: The Hunt for the Paedophile Priest Monsignor John Day' by Denis Ryan and Peter Hoysted

Ray Cassin
06 August 2013

Many people have heard of Gerald Ridsdale, defrocked Catholic priest of the diocese of Ballarat and a notorious convicted paedophile. But comparatively few people have heard of Ridsdale’ More

Daniel Herborn reviews 'Every Parent’s Nightmare' by Belinda Hawkins

Daniel Herborn
26 May 2013

Like the best examples of true crime books, Every Parent’s Nightmare goes far beyond the tragedy at its centre and places it in its socio-economic context. Belinda Hawkins details More

Neal Blewett on 'After Words: The Post-Prime Ministerial Speeches' by P.J. Keating

Neal Blewett
23 January 2012

As of writing, Australia has six living ex-prime ministers – not quite a record. Of these, one, of course, is still in parliamentary harness, and may still aspire to the top job. Of the More

Miriam Zolin reviews 'Animal People' by Charlotte Wood

Miriam Zolin
24 November 2011

Early in Charlotte Wood’s previous novel The Children (2007), one of Stephen Connolly’s sisters describes him as lost; she says he carries within him ‘a bedrock of resentment … never articulated and never resolved, but which has formed the foundation for his every conversation, every glance from his guarded eyes’. Readers may disagree with this harsh assessment as they read W ... More

Emma Kowal reviews 'A Different Inequality: The politics of debate about remote Aboriginal Australia' by Diane Austin-Broos

Emma Kowal
25 October 2011

Many Australians are hungry for answers to Indigenous disadvantage. In recent years, anthropologists have been among those who have proposed solutions. This latest offering is from Diane A More

Geoffrey Blainey reviews 'The Biggest Estate on Earth: How Aborigines Made Australia' by Bill Gammage

Geoffrey Blainey
25 October 2011

This bold book, with its lucid prose and vivid illustrations, will be discussed for years to come. It is not original in the narrow sense of the word, but it takes an important idea to new More

Chris Flynn reviews 'Shakespeare's Hamlet' by Nicki Greenberg

Chris Flynn
08 June 2011
Lawyer Nicki Greenberg spent six years converting The Great Gatsby to graphic novel format, an interesting project that was universally acclaimed and respe More
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