Competitions and programs (82)

2021 ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize

18 December 2020 Written by Australian Book Review

Opening: 20 January 2021

First prize: $AU6,000

Second prize: $AU4,000

Third prize: $AU2,500



Entries are opening soon on 21 January 2021 for the Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize. The Jolley Prize is worth a total of AU$12,500 – first place will receive $6,000, second place will receive $4,000, and third place will receive $2,500.

The Jolley Prize is open to all short story writers writing in English. We seek original short stories of between 2,000 and 5,000 words.

Click here for more information about past winners and to read their stories

 

Exclusivity

Entries may be offered elsewhere during the judging of the Jolley Prize. If an entrant is longlisted and has their story offered elsewhere, the entrant will have 24 hours to decide if they wish to withdraw their story on offer elsewhere or from the Jolley Prize. Exclusivity is essential for longlisted stories to remain in contention for shortlisting.

 

Entry fees

Online entry (current ABR subscriber) - $15
Online entry (standard/non subscriber) - $25*

  • Non-subscribers will receive digital access to ABR free of charge for four months.

 

Special online entry + subscription bundles

Subsequent entries may be submitted at the subscriber rate

Online entry + digital ABR subscription - $65
Online entry + Print subscription (Australia) - $100
Online entry + Print subscription (NZ and Asia) - $190
Online entry + Print subscription (Rest of World) - $210


ABR gratefully acknowledges Ian Dickson's generous support for the Jolley Prize.

Payment Complete – Calibre Essay Prize

14 October 2020 Written by Australian Book Review

Success

Thank you for entering the Calibre Essay Prize.

If you created a new account to enter, you can now sign in with the Username and Password you entered. Simply click 'Sign In' in the top left-hand corner to enter your details. We hope you enjoy reading our extensive archive going back to 1978.

If you wish to submit another entry to the Calibre Essay Prize, click here to return to the entry form. Remember to first sign in with your new ABR account before entering multiple entries.

Worth $7,500 | Enter the 2021 Calibre Essay Prize

12 October 2020 Written by Australian Book Review

Prize money: $7,500

Open until: 15 January 2021, 11:59 pm 

Judges: Sheila Fitzpatrick, Billy Griffiths, and Peter Rose 


ABR welcomes entries in the 2021 Calibre Essay Prize. The Prize is open to all essayists writing in English. We seek essays of between 2,000 and 5,000 words on any subject. We welcome essays of all kinds: personal or political, literary or speculative, traditional or experimental. Founded in 2007, the Calibre Prize is one of the world’s leading prizes for a new non-fiction essay.

 

Past winners

Click the link for more information about past winners and to read their essays.

 

FAQs and Terms and Conditions

Please read our Frequently Asked Questions before contacting us with queries about the Calibre Prize.

Before entering the Calibre Essay Prize, all entrants must read the Terms and Conditions.

 

Exclusivity

Entries may be offered elsewhere during the judging of the Calibre Prize. If an entrant is longlisted and has their essay offered elsewhere, the entrant will have 24 hours to decide if they would like to withdraw their essay on offer elsewhere or from the Calibre Prize. Exclusivity is essential for longlisted essays. The overall winning essay will be published in the magazine in the May 2021 issue with the runner-up to be published later in the year.

 

Entry fees

Current ABR subscribers: $15
Standard/non-subscribers: $25*

*All non-subscribers will automatically receive four-month digital access to ABR free of charge.

 

Entry + subscription bundles

Entry + 1-year digital subscription: $65
Entry + 1-year print subscription (Australia): $100
Entry + 1-year print subscription (NZ and Asia): $190
Entry + 1-year print subscription (Rest of World): $210

Those who purchase a subscription while entering will be able to submit subsequent entries at the subscriber rate ($15).

 


We gratefully acknowledge the long-standing support of Colin Golvan AM QC, Peter McLennan, and Mary-Ruth Sindrey.

2021 Calibre Essay Prize Judges

12 October 2020 Written by Australian Book Review

Sheila FitzpatrickSheila Fitzpatrick is a Professor at Australian Catholic University and Honorary Professor at the University of Sydney, and co-winner (2016) of the Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Non-Fiction. Her new book, White Russians, Red Peril: A Cold War history of migration to Australia, will be published by Black Inc. in April 2021.

 

 

 

Billy GriffithsBilly Griffiths is an Australian writer and historian. His latest book, Deep Time Dreaming: Uncovering Ancient Australia (Black Inc., 2018), won the Ernest Scott Prize, the Felicia A. Holton Book Award, the John Mulvaney Book Award, the Douglas Stewart Prize for Non-Fiction and the 2019 Book of the Year at the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards. He lectures in Cultural Heritage and Museum Studies at Deakin University in Melbourne.

 

 

Peter RosePeter Rose has been Editor of Australian Book Review since 2001. Previously he was a publisher at Oxford University Press. His reviews and essays have appeared mostly in ABR. He has published six books of poetry, two novels, and a family memoir, Rose Boys (Text Publishing), which won the 2003 National Biography Award. He edited the 2007 and 2008 editions of The Best Australian Poems (Black Inc.). His most recent publication is a volume of poems, The Subject of Feeling (UWA Publishing, 2015). 

 

 

Winner | 2020 Jolley Prize | Mykaela Saunders for 'River Story'

13 August 2020 Written by Australian Book Review

2020 Jolley Prize Winner: Mykaela Saunders

ABR is delighted to announce that Mykaela Saunders is the overall winner of the 2020 ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize for her story ‘River Story’. Mykaela Saunders receives $6,000. C.J. Garrow was placed second for his story 'Egg Timer', and Simone Hollander was placed third for her story 'Hieroglyph'. We would like to congratulate all three shortlisted entrants and thank all those who entered their stories in the Jolley Prize.

The ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize is one of the country’s most prestigious awards for short fiction. This year the Jolley Prize attracted almost 1,450 entries from 34 different countries. The judges were Gregory Day, Josephine Rowe, and Ellen van Neerven. The three shortlisted stories appear in our August Fiction issue.

 

About Mykaela Saunders

Mykaela Saunders (photograph supplied)

Mykaela Saunders is a Koori writer, teacher, and community researcher. Of Dharug and Lebanese ancestry, she’s working-class and queer, and belongs to the Tweed Aboriginal community. Mykaela has worked in Aboriginal education since 2003, and her research explores trans-generational trauma and healing in her community. Mykaela began writing fiction and poetry in 2017, as part of her Doctor of Arts degree at the University of Sydney. Her work has since been published across forms and disciplines, placed in writing prizes, and attracted funding and fellowships.

Payment Complete – Peter Porter Poetry Prize

30 July 2020 Written by Australian Book Review

Thank you for entering the Peter Porter Poetry Prize.

If you created a new account to enter, you can now sign in with the Username and Password you entered. Simply click 'Sign In' in the top left-hand corner to enter your details. We hope you enjoy reading our extensive archive going back to 1978.

If you wish to submit another entry to the Porter Prize, click here to return to the entry form. Remember to first sign in with your new ABR account before entering multiple entries.

2021 Porter Prize Judges

14 July 2020 Written by Australian Book Review

Lachlan Brown 800x500 monoLachlan Brown is a senior lecturer in English at Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga. He is the author of Limited Cities (Giramondo, 2012) and Lunar Inheritance (Giramondo, 2017). Lachlan has been shortlisted and commended for various poetry prizes including the Mary Gilmore Prize, the Newcastle Poetry Prize, the Gwen Harwood Poetry Prize, the Judith Wright Poetry Prize, and the Macquarie Fields Poetry Prize. Lachlan is currently the vice-president of Booranga Writers Centre in Wagga Wagga. His poem 'Precision Signs' was shortlisted in the 2020 Peter Porter Poetry Prize. 

 

John HawkeJohn Hawke is a Senior Lecturer, specialising in poetry, at Monash University. His books include Australian Literature and the Symbolist Movement, Poetry and the Trace (co-edited with Ann Vickery), and the volume of poetry Aurelia, which received the 2015 Anne Elder award. He is ABR's Poetry Editor.

 

 

A. Frances JohnsonA Frances Johnson is a writer, artist, and a Senior Lecturer at the University of Melbourne. Her fourth poetry collection, Save As, is forthcoming from Puncher & Wattmann. A previous collection, Rendition for Harp and Kalashnikov (Puncher & Wattmann, 2017), was shortlisted in the 2018 Melbourne Prize for Literature Best New Writing Award. Other books include the novel Eugene's Falls (Arcadia, 2007), which retraces the journeys of colonial painter Eugene von Guérard, and a monograph, Australian Fiction as Archival Salvage (Brill, 2015). Her poem ‘My Father’s Thesaurus’ won the 2020 Peter Porter Poetry Prize.

  

John Kinsella 240John Kinsella is the author of over forty books. His most recent publications include Displaced: A rural memoir (2020), The Weave (with Thurston Moore, 2020), and Insomnia (2020). His poetry collections have won a variety of awards, including the Prime Minister's Literary Award for Poetry and the Christopher Brennan Award for Poetry. His volumes of stories include In the Shade of the Shady Tree (Ohio University Press, 2012), Crow’s Breath (Transit Lounge, 2015), and Old Growth (Transit Lounge, 2017). He is a Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge University, and Professor of Literature and Environment at Curtin University. With Tracy Ryan he is the co-editor of The Fremantle Press Anthology of The Western Australian Poetry (2017). He lives with his family in the Western Australian wheatbelt. 

2021 Peter Porter Poetry Prize

19 June 2020 Written by Australian Book Review

Australian Book Review is pleased to announce the shortlist for the 2021 Peter Porter Poetry Prize. First presented in 2005, the Porter Prize is one of the world’s leading prizes for a new poem. It is worth a total of $10,000. This year, our judges – John Hawke, Lachlan Brown, A. Frances Johnson, and John Kinsella – had 1329 poems to assess, the largest field in the history of the Porter Prize. To read the shortlisted poems, please click here.

The winner will be announced at an online ceremony at 5pm on January 27. The event will feature the shortlisted poets introducing and reading their poems before a special guest announces the overall winner. 

This is a free event but bookings are essential (an access link will be sent out closer to the date): This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

The five shortlisted poems are:

 

'The Vernal Equinox Story' by Danielle Blau (USA)

Blau Danielle Blau’s Rhyme or Reason: Poets, philosophers, and the problem of being here now is forthcoming from W.W. Norton. Her chapbook mere eye was selected for a Poetry Society of America Chapbook Award and published with an introduction by poet D.A. Powell, and her poems won first place in the multi-genre Narrative 30 Below Contest. Poetry, short stories, articles, and interviews by Blau appear in various pubilcations. A graduate of Brown University with an honours degree in philosophy, and of New York University with an MFA in poetry, she curates and hosts the monthly Gavagai Music + Reading Series in Brooklyn, teaches at Hunter College in Manhattan, and lives in Queens. You can learn more about her at danielleblau.com.

 

'Would You Rather' by Y.S. Lee (Canada)

Y.S. Lee NEW 2020 Photo by Scott AdamsonY.S. Lee’s fiction includes the young adult mystery series The Agency (Candlewick Press/Walker Books), which was translated into six languages and has either won or been shortlisted for various prizes. In July 2020, her poem ‘Mr. T in Your Pocket’ won Arc Poetry Magazine’s monthly Award of Awesomeness. She lives in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, within traditional Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee territory.

 

'bila, a river cycle' by Jazz Money (NSW)

Jazz Money NEW 2020 Photo by Natalie IronfieldJazz Money is a poet and filmmaker of Wiradjuri heritage, currently based on the beautiful sovereign lands of the Darug and Gundungurra nations. Her poetry has been published widely and reimagined as murals, installation, and film. Jazz is the 2020 winner of the David Unaipon Award from the State Library of Queensland, and her début collection of poetry is forthcoming from University of Queensland Press in 2021.

 

'A Poetics of Fo(u)rgetting' by Sara M. Saleh (NSW)

Sara M. Saleh NEW 2020Sara M. Saleh is the daughter of migrants from Palestine, Egypt, and Lebanon, living and learning on Gadigal land. A human rights activist, community organiser, and campaigner for refugee rights and racial justice, she has spent over a decade in grassroots and international organisations in Australia and the Middle East. Her poetry and writing has been published in English and Arabic in various places. She is co-editor of the recently released anthology, Arab-Australian-Other: Stories on Race and Identity. She is currently developing her first novel as a recipient of the inaugural Affirm Press Mentorship for Sweatshop Western Sydney.

 

'before dawn, with the street lamp's beam across your face' by Raisa Tolchinsky (USA)

Raisa Tolchinsky NEW 2020Raisa Tolchinsky is a poet, editor, and teacher. She has previously lived and worked in Chicago, New York, Italy, and Iceland, and she is trained as an amateur boxer. Raisa received her BA in English Literature and Italian Studies from Bowdoin College and the University of Bologna. Currently, Raisa is a Poe/Faulkner fellow in poetry at the University of Virginia. More of her work can be found at www.raisatolchinsky.com

 

 

Congratulations to the full longlist:

 

Danielle Blau (USA), ‘The Vernal Equinox Story’ – Shortlisted
Bonny Cassidy (Vic.), ‘Title’ – Longlisted
Suzanne Cleary (USA), ‘For the Poet Who Writes to Me While Standing in Line at CVS, Waiting for His Mother's Prescription’ – Longlisted
Justin Clemens (Vic.), ‘Thus Spuke Zerothruster’ – Longlisted
Kristen Lang (Tas.), ‘framing the mirror’ – Longlisted
Anthony Lawrence (QLD), ‘Levitation’ – Longlisted
Y.S. Lee (Canada), ‘Would You Rather’ – Shortlisted
Fiona Lynch (Vic.), ‘The Audit’ – Longlisted
Damen O’Brien (QLD), ‘Carpool’ – Longlisted
Jazz Money (NSW),bila, a river cycle’ – Shortlisted
Sara M. Saleh (NSW), ‘A Poetics of Fo(u)rgetting’ – Shortlisted
Raisa Tolchinsky (USA), ‘before dawn, with the street lamp’s beam across your face’– Shortlisted

 


Click here for more information about past winners and to read their poems.

We gratefully acknowledge the long-standing support of Morag Fraser AM and Andrew Taylor AM.

 

2020 Calibre Essay Prize winner: Yves Rees

01 June 2020 Written by Australian Book Review

Yves Rees (photograph by Susan Papazian)Yves Rees (photograph by Susan Papazian)Yves Rees is the winner of the 2020 Calibre Essay Prize, worth a total of $7,500, for their essay ‘Reading the Mess Backwards’. As Rees writes, the essay is ‘a story of trans becoming that digs into the messiness of bodies, gender and identity’. Yves Rees receives $5,000.

Kate Middleton was named runner-up for ‘The Dolorimeter’, a highly personal account of the author’s experience with illness. She receives $2,500.

ABR Editor Peter Rose judged the Prize with J.M. Coetzee (Nobel Laureate) and Lisa Gorton, (poet, novelist, and essayist). They chose Yves Rees's winning essay from almost 600 entries from twenty-nine different countries, a record field.

Reading the Mess Backwards’ appears in the June-July 2020 issue. We look forward to publishing Kate Middleton's essay 'The Dolorimeter' in the August 2020 issue.

Yves Rees on ‘Reading the Mess Backwards’

Having come out as transgender aged thirty-one, I re-examine my youth in light of this new knowledge. 'Reading the Mess Backwards' explores how we come to understand and perform our gender in a world of restrictive binaries and male dominance. By insisting upon the slippery nature of gendered identity, the essay questions what means to be 'male' or 'female' – and raises the possibility of being something else altogether.

Yves Rees on winning the Calibre Prize

I am honoured to be awarded the Calibre Prize, especially given the large field this year. In my essay, I’ve sketched the kind of narrative I hungered to read: a story of trans becoming that digs into the messiness of bodies, gender and identity. My hope is that, as such stories proliferate, we will all – men and women, cisgender and trans – be liberated from the prison of patriarchy, with its suffocating gender binary. The recognition afforded by the Calibre Prize is an important step in that struggle.

Commendations

In addition, the judges commended five essays, and we look forward to publishing some of them in coming months. They are: 

  • Sue Cochius: ‘Mrs Mahomet’
  • Julian Davies: ‘A Small Boy and Cambodia’
  • Mireille Juchau: ‘Only One Refused’
  • Laura Kolbe: ‘Human Women, Magic Flutes’
  • Meredith Wattison: ‘Ambivalence: The Afterlife of Patrick White’

About Yves Rees

Dr Yves Rees is a writer and historian living on unceded Wurundjeri land. At present, Yves is a Lecturer in History at La Trobe University and co-host of the history podcast Archive Fever. Yves has published widely across Australian gender, transnational and economic history, and also writes on transgender identity and politics. Yves is a regular contributor to ABC Radio and The Conversation.

About Kate Middleton

Kate Middleton is an Australian writer. She is the author of the poetry collections Fire Season (Giramondo, 2009), awarded the Western Australian Premier’s Award for Poetry in 2009 and Ephemeral Waters (Giramondo, 2013), shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s award in 2014. From September 2011 to September 2012 she was the inaugural Sydney City Poet.


Further information

pdfMedia release

Subscribe to ABR to gain access to this issue, plus the ABR archive.

Click here for more information about past winners and to read their essays.

We look forward to offering the Calibre Essay Prize again in 2021. 

ABR gratefully acknowledges the generous support from Colin Golvan AM QC, and Peter McLennan and Mary-Ruth Sindrey, whose donations make the Calibre Essay Prize possible in this form.

2020 Jolley Prize Judges

20 January 2020 Written by Australian Book Review

Maxine Beneba Clarke colour cropped

Gregory Day is a novelist, poet, and composer from the Eastern Otways region of southwest Victoria, Australia. His latest novel A Sand Archive was shortlisted for the 2019 Miles Franklin Award and his essay 'Summer on The Painkalac' was also shortlisted for the 2019 Nature Conservancy Nature Writing Prize. Day is a winner of the Australian Literature Society Gold Medal and was joint winner of the 2011 ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize for 'The Neighbour's Beans'. 

 

 

 

 

Josephine Rowe (photograph by Derek Shapton)

Josephine Rowe is the author of three story collections and a novel, A Loving, Faithful Animal (2016). She is a fellow of the Wallace Stegner Program at Stanford University, and her writing has appeared in McSweeney's Quarterly ConcernMeanjinLiterary HubThe MonthlyGranta, and elsewhere. Rowe's short story ‘Glisk’ won the 2016 ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize. Her new story collection, Here Until August, is published by Black Inc.

 

 

 

 

Ellen van Neerven (photograph by Anna Jacobson)

Ellen van Neerven (born in Meanjin (Brisbane) in 1990) is an award-winning writer and editor of Mununjali Yugambeh (South East Queensland) and Dutch heritage. Ellen’s first book, Heat and Light, was the recipient of the David Unaipon Award, the Dobbie Literary Award and the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards Indigenous Writers Prize. Ellen’s second book, a collection of poetry, Comfort Food, was shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards Kenneth Slessor Prize and highly commended for the 2016 Wesley Michel Wright Prize. Throat is Ellen’s second poetry collection, a May 2020 release.