Geraldine Brooks

Brian McFarlane reviews 'People of the Book' by Geraldine Brooks

Brian McFarlane
10 July 2019

‘I wanted to give a sense of the people of the book, the different hands that had made it, used it, protected it. I wanted it to More

Brenda Niall reviews 'March' by Geraldine Brooks

Brenda Niall
05 March 2019

Spacious and solidly constructed, the classic nineteenth-century novel invites revisiting. Later writers reconfigure its well-known spaces, change the lighting, More

Morag Fraser reviews 'The Secret Chord' by Geraldine Brooks

Morag Fraser
24 September 2015

Geraldine Brooks credits her son, Nathaniel, with sparking the idea and title for her latest novel. For his bar mitzvah, Nathaniel chose to play an arrangement for harp of Leonard Cohen’s famous ‘Hallelujah’. It begins with these lines: ‘Now I’ve heard there was a secret chord / That David played, and it pleased the Lord.’

Music is crucial to Bro ... More

The missing novels: our critics nominate some overlooked classics

Debra Adelaide et al.
24 August 2015

Early success is no guarantee of a book’s continued availability or circulation. Some major and/or once-fashionable authors recede from public consciousness, and in some cases go out of print. We invited some writers and critics to identity novelists who they feel should be better known.

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Sophie Cunningham reviews 'Caleb's Crossing' by Geraldine Brooks

Sophie Cunningham
24 May 2011

Geraldine Brooks has an extraordinary radar for a good story, a curiosity that has carried her, and her readers, from Year of Wonders (2001), set during England’s plague of 1666; to March andthe American Civil War; to medieval Spain and the People of the Book (2008).Her latest novel, Caleb’s Crossing, is set closer to the place Brooks calls home – in th ... More

Open Page with Geraldine Brooks

20 April 2011

Why do you write?

Because I like to eat.

Are you a vivid dreamer?

During the day. I love reverie. It’s underrated. As T.E. Lawrence put it: ‘The dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream, to make it possible. This I di ... More