Henry Kissinger: On China

Kissinger on the Asian powerhouse

Bruce Grant

 

On China
by Henry Kissinger
Allen Lane, $49.95 hb, 586 pp, 9781846143465

 

Henry Kissinger has never seemed at home in the United States, although he has served in its highest councils and received its richest rewards. When I was one of his students at Harvard, we called him Henry, to distinguish him from professorial luminaries such as Galbraith, Riesman, and Schlesinger. He did not fit the insistent reasonableness of the Harvard faculty. His guttural voice, anxiety to please, mischievous, self-deprecating humour, and fearsome views on nuclear warfare made him an almost unbelievable figure of playful profundity.

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Bruce Grant

Bruce Grant

In an active public life as foreign correspondent, columnist, academic, and diplomat, Bruce Grant has also written ten works of non-fiction, three novels, essays and many short stories. His first book Indonesia became a classic. He was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, Australian High Commissioner in New Delhi, foundation chairman of the Australia-Indonesia Institute, chairman of the Australian Dance Theatre, chairman of the Victorian Premier’s literary awards, and president of Melbourne’s International Arts Festival.