Alexis Wright

Favourite Australian Novels of the twenty-first century

Australian Book Review
Monday, 23 September 2019

Ten years after the first ABR FAN Poll, the second one was limited to Australian novels published since 2000 (though we received votes for recent classics such as 1984, Voss, and Monkey Grip). When voting closed in mid-September, Richard Flanagan’s Booker Prize-winning novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North emerged ...

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Kate McFadyen reviews Carpentaria by Alexis Wright

Kate McFadyen
Thursday, 20 June 2019

There is a mesmerising scene in Carpentaria when Joseph Midnight is asked if he has seen the fugitive Will Phantom, a young local Aboriginal man who is single-handedly waging a guerrilla war against a large lead ore mining company. He eyes the questioner and astutely spots him as a ‘Southern blackfella …

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News from the Editor's Desk - May 2018

Australian Book Review
Tuesday, 24 April 2018

News from the Editors Desk

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ABR on Tour

Next month ABR Editor Peter Rose and Development Consultant Christopher Menz will lead the

In Alexis Wright’s novel Carpentaria (2006), Girlie claims, ‘If you ever want to find out about anything in your vicinity, you have to talk to the mad people.’ There are a lot of mad people in Wright’s biography of Aboriginal activist, thinker, and provocateur ‘Tracker’ Tilmouth. He is probably the maddest of all, in the ...

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News from the Editor's Desk - January-February 2018

Australian Book Review
Monday, 18 December 2017

With this double issue, Australian Book Review enters its fortieth year. ABR was of course founded in Adelaide in 1961 as a monthly magazine. Max Harris and Rosemary Wighton edited the first series, whose final, quarterly appearances lapsed in 1974. The second series was created in 1978 under the auspices of ...

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Jen Webb reviews 'The Swan Book' by Alexis Wright

Jen Webb
Wednesday, 21 August 2013

‘Without an indigenous literature, people can remain alien in their own soil,’ wrote Miles Franklin, initiator of an Australian literary prize that has been awarded to just two Aboriginal writers: Kim Scott for Benang in 2000 and That Deadman Dance in 2011; and Alexis Wright for Carpentaria in 2007. Franklin, of course, didn’t mean I ...