Kayang and Me by Kim Scott and Hazel Brown

by
October 2005, no. 275

Kayang and Me by Kim Scott and Hazel Brown

FACP, $29.95 pb, 270 pp

Kayang and Me by Kim Scott and Hazel Brown

by
October 2005, no. 275

Readers of Kayang and Me should not be lulled by the beauty of its prose or by its seemingly easy location within the now-familiar genre of indigenous life story. This book dislodges its white readers from positions of quietude or certainty, and takes us into a world marked by irredeemable loss – our own as well as Noongars’. Among other things, Kayang and Me points to the crucial things that settler-colonisers have lost or forsaken in the mistaken pursuit of the bounties of colonisation, and it calls for nothing less than a radical remaking of the Australian nation-state. Significantly, it installs writing and reading as practices through which the past, present and future might come to be differently known and newly imagined. The white reader is shown to be implicated in the story she holds in her hands, in its vision of another future as well as in its tragic present and past.

Alison Ravenscroft reviews 'Kayang and Me' by Kim Scott and Hazel Brown

Kayang and Me

by Kim Scott and Hazel Brown

FACP, $29.95 pb, 270 pp

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