Tali Lavi

Tali Lavi reviews 'The Storyteller: Selected stories' by Serge Liberman

Tali Lavi
31 August 2018

When I look at certain images of German-born photographer Roman Vishniac, the accompanying pain is acute, for his mesmerising monochromatic portraits of Eastern European Jews before their More

The Antipodes (Red Stitch Actors’ Theatre) ★★★1/2

Tali Lavi
16 July 2018

Strange and terrible events unfold around us. Conflicts erupt; catastrophes occur; a billionaire reality television performer reminiscent of a snake oil merchant is elected president of th More

Foxtrot ★★★★★

Tali Lavi
21 June 2018

A doorbell rings. Along with the Feldman family, we are catapulted into Samuel Maoz’s mesmerising drama, one worthy of its Greek tragedian and European absurdist antecedents. Deeply shoc More

Tali Lavi reviews 'The Tattooist Of Auschwitz' by Heather Morris

Tali Lavi
22 February 2018

Early on in this book, the fictional Lale Sokolov, based on the real man of that name who survived Auschwitz and its horrors to eventually live in suburban Melbourne, has his arm tattooed. More

Hir (Red Stitch Actors' Theatre) ★★★★

Tali Lavi
06 February 2018

A soldier comes home from war only to find that home is not what it once was. This premise, fertile with dramatic possibilities, has inspired storytellers from Homer and Sophocles to conte More

Tali Lavi reviews 'Stop Fixing Women: Why building fairer workplaces is everybody’s business' by Catherine Fox

Tali Lavi
30 August 2017

In A Room of One’s Own (1929), Virginia Woolf instructs women to ‘write calmly’ and ‘not in a rage’. Commentator Catherine Fox writes ‘calmly’ about contemporary realities with great potential to spark rage.

Stop Fixing Women operates partly as a rejoinder to Sheryl Sandberg’s popular manifesto Lean In (2013), which addressed ‘internal obstac ... More

Tali Lavi reviews 'Once We Were Sisters' by Sheila Kocher

Tali Lavi
23 July 2017

As Nadine Gordimer once mused, ‘Writing is making sense of life. You work your whole life and perhaps you’ve made sense of one small area.’ Sheila Kohler’s site of personal hauntin More

Tali Lavi reviews 'As the Lonely Fly' by Sara Dowse

Tali Lavi
29 May 2017

Sara Dowse is a fine observer of politics and power. Her new novel, As the Lonely Fly, traverses three continents over fifty years and contains a multitude of characters, but its focus is honed in on three sisters, of sorts. While Chekhov’s play of that name is typified by waiting, Dowse’s story is of continuous flux and upheaval. Clara-later-Chava, Man ... More

Tali Lavi review 'Behind the Text: Candid conversations with Australian creative nonfiction writers' by Sue Joseph

Tali Lavi
27 March 2017

What’s in a name? Academic Sue Joseph interviews eleven Australian non-fiction writers, a varied group which includes Paul McGeough, Doris Pilkington Garimara, and Kate Holden. Joseph is on a quest to uncover whether Australian ‘creative non-fiction’ exists here, as it does in other countries, and to understand what the term signifies to her subjects.

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Tali Lavi reviews 'Barking Dogs' by Rebekah Clarkson

Tali Lavi
26 February 2017

Mount Barker, its surrounding environs and proliferating estates, might be situated in volcanic territory for all the ferocious eruptions of violence that occur in Rebekah Clarkson’s collection of stories, Barking Dogs. The demographic is noticeably white Australian. In ‘Dancing on Your Bones’, a loathsome consultant suggests the government develop the Summit ... More